Everyday restaurants

This quiet café with a rural theme is an embodiment of the Russian dream of Provence. The flowerpots, straw furniture and shelves with books definitely belong. So does the pink bicycle out front, where patrons like to take their selfies. The menu is rather heavy on baked products and pastries. For "proper" food, they have several pasta entries, dorado and salmon steak with grilled vegetables and a few other options. Business lunch is served on weekdays, and its menu is updated daily. Breakfast starts at 9 in the morning: porridge, syrniki (cottage cheese pancakes), sunny side up eggs… everything is nicely laid out and inexpensive. Your cappuccino will invariably come with a little drawing in its froth: a bear, a cat, or something else. They have mime entertainers on weekends.
This is a hip urban café with a mixed-up menu and a good reputation. Art Coffee has been around so long that its proprietors know without fail what the crowd wants. The menu is peppered with the best-selling entrees from a wide variety of cuisines and everyone seems to enjoy this multiculinarism: shuba herring salad next to quesadillas, pumpkin soup, borscht, khachapuri, and what not. They have animators entertaining the kids on holidays. Various discounts and specials apply on weekdays. They serve breakfast classics in the morning: cottage cheese pancakes with jam, toasts, honey wafers, eggs, porridge, croissants, and you can order your coffee mixed with orange juice.
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This inexpensive café, almost a traditional Tatar diner, is located right in the centre of the city, halfway down the pedestrian Ulitsa Baumana (Baumana Street). The interior is modest, some tables are covered with white tablecloths and some with oilcloths, and the trays are plastic. This is not the kind of place where you would want to outstay your meal. You eat and move on. But do stop by for the food. The Tatar soups and pastries are superb here, and the prices are very sparing. Dom Chaya is definitely ideal for a quick and inexpensive lunch.
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Reserve Russia 2018 LOC is not liable for any reservation services provided by third parties.
This international restaurant at the Ramada Kazan Hotel is just one sprawling space with tables standing pretty close to each other. They serve breakfast here from 6:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m., and business lunch from 12 p.m. to 4 p.m. on weekdays, but the main menu is available at all times. The prices are a bit higher than the average. Americano's chef Ilya Frolov offers his cuisine d'auteur sets daily, from 6 p.m. to midnight. The kids' menu is basic and more affordable.
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Reserve Russia 2018 LOC is not liable for any reservation services provided by third parties.
This café is a magnet for students from nearby art schools, mostly artists and dancers. These creative young people deserve to be fed the most exquisite gourmet food, and that is what they get at Kvartira 63. Here are a few examples: pumpkin soup with cottage cheese, duck with carrot and raisins, chocolate cake with sea salt. Twice a year the gastrobar holds its own Dinner Club 63, an event for gourmands, where chef Bulat Igragimov prepares a special menu with 5 to 14 dishes.
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This chain cafeteria, due to its great food and super low prices, tends to be packed at all times. The prices of the same dishes will change slightly in the course of the day. There is an online calculator on the cafeteria's website, which you can use to tally up your lunch. The DS at Kazan's central Ulitsa Baumana (Baumana Street) is the most popular cafeteria of the whole chain. On holidays DS will sometimes treat its patrons to free borscht or stuffed pies. Vegetarian specialties are shown separately on the menu – a touch of thoughtfulness rare among cafeterias. DS bakes pies to order.
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Reserve Russia 2018 LOC is not liable for any reservation services provided by third parties.
Skazka is a children's café existing since 1970. Its menu and interiors have changed, but not its hospitality. The walls here are painted over with forests and seas. Skazka makes its own ice-cream, not to mention a plethora of other dessert options and milkshakes. There is an adult menu to make sure the adults do not go hungry or get bored, featuring, among other offerings, steaks, Skazka's extra popular pasta carbonara, and a limited selection of alcohol. Skazka has a great porch with outdoor seating in summer. The sign out front says "First Family Café," and it is true: Skazka gets so crowded on weekends that people are asked to reserve tables in advance.
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This urban café is mostly dedicated to crepes, or bliny: with clarified butter, chicken, honey, mushrooms, mozzarella and ham, salmon, and other fillings. They also offer soups, salads, meat entrees and other more familiar food. The interior is basic, with no "special effects" to distract one from eating. The café takes up two floors. On the second floor, they actually have a full restaurant with piano evenings and literary readings, while the ground floor space is a self-service cafeteria Blinnaya. Arguably the best format for a food and beverage establishment in the touristy Ulitsa Baumana (Baumana Street): you quickly grab bliny and get on with exploring the city.
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This is an affordable cafeteria for a quick and cheap yet filling and delicious meal. It is suitable for children. Bright-coloured furniture, plump bees painted on the walls, Animal Planet on TV screens, dispensing counter with trays, and basic and agreeable food on the counter: pilaf, noodle soup, sausages, and macaroni and meat. There is a game area behind a flashy fence in Chak-Chak, and some high chairs for small children. The place is usually packed, and the food goes quickly off the counter. Chak-Chak is divided into two spaces: the buffet zone and the dining area. The diner has a self-serve microwave oven to heat up the food when your child has played too long, letting the food grow cold.
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This restaurant is attached to the jazz club. Gigs are played here in the evening. In the daytime, however, one has to make do with musicians' portraits on the walls. People come here mainly for the atmosphere, the gastronomic element comes second. Perekrestok Jazza offers a mix of Tatar, Russian and European food, e.g. Pozharsky cutlets, steaks, chebureki and pasta carbonara. They serve breakfast in the morning. Perekrestok Jazza will zestfully celebrate all kinds of holidays, from Maslenitsa to Saint Valentine's Day.