Observation decks

Pavel Novikov/Welcome2018.com

Nizhny Novgorod’s most spellbinding view opens from this embankment. You look out upon the Strelka (the spit at the confluence of the Oka and the Volga), the St. Alexander Nevsky Cathedral and the historical grounds of the Nizhny Novgorod Fair below. The statue of Soviet writer Maksim Gorky on Fedorovsky Embankment is considered one of the writer’s most elegiac images. Newlyweds like to come to Fedorovsky Embankment for their wedding photo shoots, judging by the profusion of little “happiness locks” on the pedestrian hang-bridge across the nearby ravine. Photographers generally favour this spot, what with the perfect, postcard quality shots you  get here. There’s a lot of kite launching going on here in summer.  

Pavel Novikov/Welcome2018.com

Grebeshok (or Crest) is the popular name given to the high Oka bank section between the Kanavino and Molitovka Bridges. This hill once was so broken through with ravines it looked like a rooster’s crest. Time has smoothed out the terrain, but the name has stuck. Tour buses never bring visitors here: they couldn’t even get here through the narrow lanes. But it’s well worth the trip to come here, in order to walk these old-fashioned curbs and appreciate the view of the Pokhvalinsky Slope, Annunciation Monastery, Kanavino Bridge, and the old neighbourhoods around the abandoned mill of the Bashkirov merchant family. 

Pavel Novikov/Welcome2018.com

The stele with the names of Nizhny Novgorod natives killed in action, and the Eternal Flame were installed inside the Kremlin in 1965 for the 20th anniversary of the victory in the Great Patriotic War. From here, you look out on the Strelka, the peaceful expanse beyond the Volga (Nizhny Novgorod suburb Bor is on the other side of the river), and the rooftops of Rozhdestvenskaya Ulitsa, once the city’s merchant main street.  

Pavel Novikov/Welcome2018.com

Kremlyovsky (Kremlin) Boulevard begins at the Valery Chkalov statue and stretches along the entire length of the Kremlin wall. The most scenic section of the boulevard begins at the Kladovaya Tower, on the high edge of the ravine above Zelensky Slope. Although this is the very centre of town, the spot looks semi-deserted even on town festival days. It’s as if the Kremlin wall hides you from the hustle and bustle of Minina Square. You can see the Strelka down below from the boulevard (it’s visible from almost every spot in the old town), and you can also see Zapochainye, the historical neighbourhood by the River Pochaina, which no longer exists: the golden onion domes, blocks of multicoloured homes… From around the Ivanovskaya Tower you can climb down to National Unity Square, and continue you walk down Rozhdestvenskaya Ulitsa.