Leningrad, Brodsky and Dovlatov

The Bronze Age of Russian literature – 1950-1970 – is the Leningrad youth of the future Nobel Prize winner Joseph Brodsky and the most read prose writer of Russia – Sergey Dovlatov.
This itinerary includes the famous “one-and-a-half rooms” of Muruzi’s house where Brodsky lived with his family, the apartment museum of Anna Akhmatova with the preserved Brodsky’s room in which he worked  in New York, and the route by which the young Sergey Dovlatov walked back from school.

Aleksandr Demianchuk/TASS
A walk from Chernyshevskaya metro station along Kirochnaya ulitsa up to Liteyny prospekt and then to the left up to the crossing of ulitsa Pestelya will take about 20 minutes. In 1955, the second entrance from ulitsa Pestelya would lead to the second floor flat where photojournalist Aleksandr Brodsky with his wife and son lived. Joseph Brodsky lived in this room up to his emigration in 1972.
Aleksandr Demianchuk/TASS
A chain of connected courtyards from Fontanka, 16, to ulitsa Pestelya, 7, through an arch with a lacunar, stucco works and a deep niche in the view was Joseph Brodsky’s favorite place for walks.
Aleksandr Demianchuk/TASS
Here, in the hall of the Builders Club, on March 13, 1964, the away session of Dzerzhinsky District Court took place, which sentenced Joseph Brodsky to exile.
Aleksandr Demianchuk/TASS
The working room of Joseph Brodsky from his apartment in Morton Street in New York is exhibited here.

Ticket offices close one hour earlier museum closing time. 
Aleksandr Demianchuk/TASS
Sergey Dovlatov studied at this school from 1948 to 1958.
Aleksandr Demianchuk/TASS
Sergey Dovlatov walked this way from school.
Aleksandr Demianchuk/TASS
In apartment 29 (two rooms in a communal flat) Sergey Dovlatov lived from 1944 to 1975. In 2007, a memorial tablet was placed on the house front.
Aleksandr Demianchuk/TASS
In a two-room apartment in the yard of this house Sergey Dovlatov lived with his mother Nora Sergeyevna from 1976 to 1978, until his emigration to the USA.