Petrograd Side

The Petrograd Side is regarded as one of the most beautiful districts of the city. The tenement buildings, mansions, confectioneries with enticing aromas from open doors, cozy parks and unusual museums – all this distinguishes the The Petrograd Side (Petrogradskaya Storona), which is often named as the sanctuary of modernism in St. Petersburg.

Aleksandr Demianchuk/TASS
It is situated at the edge of Kamennoostrovsky prospekt and Alexander Gardens (built in 1911, by sculptor K.V. Isenberg). On February 26, 1904, the warship was intercepted by the Japanese navy in the Yellow Sea. Almost the whole crew (49 out of 53 sailors) were killed in the artillery duel.
Aleksandr Demianchuk/TASS
The building was constructed in 1933. The house with a sun terrace, shop, restaurant, museum, kindergarten and 144 flats was designed for the members of the Society of Political Convicts and Exiles.
Aleksandr Demianchuk/TASS
During World War I, in 1914-1915, the Duke commanded the Russian troops. Currently this neo-classical mansion is the residence of Presidential Representative Plenipotentiary in the Northwestern Federal District.
Aleksandr Demianchuk/TASS
The first building of St. Petersburg. The cabin was built by soldiers of Peter I for the Tsar immediately upon founding of St. Petersburg.

Opposite the cabin on the embankment is the descend to the river. On both sides of the house are giant statues of Chinese guardian dogs Shisa, brought from Manchuria. These toy dogs which were favored by the empresses of the Manchurian Dynasty in reality are the size of a cat.

Ticket offices: Mon, Wed, Fri-Sun 10 a.m. - 5:30 p.m., Thu 1 p.m. - 8:30 p.m.
From the roof of the building, constructed in 1940, two giant sculptures (a sailor and a worker) sharply look over the Summer Gardenm which is situated across from the house.
Aleksandr Demianchuk/TASS
The former College House of the Emperor Peter the Great is a prime example of Baroque architecture: a tower with a steeple, a roof with a “break”, rustic columns (pilaster strips), fine fenestration, two-color wall paint, cartouche with the Emperor’s bust level with the third floor over the main entrance.
Aleksandr Demianchuk/TASS
The neo-classical gate of hammered metal and hanging lamp in the garden arch survived to our time. A panel painting depicting Archangel Michael’s victory in the battle with the Devil is found in the courtyard. A high relief a girl inviting a tired wanderer to the house is also found here.
Aleksandr Demianchuk/TASS
The building was constructed in 1906 by architect Alexander von Hohen for the Russian ballet prima Mathilde Kschessinska – a sweetheart of Nicholas II, and two Grand Dukes: Sergei Mikhailovich and his cousin Andrei Vladimirovich. In the spring and summer of 1917, the mansion was used as Bolshevik headquarters.
Aleksandr Demianchuk/TASS
Constructed in 1914 by architect A.I. Klein. It was a condominium residential building. In the run up to World War I condominiums just started to become fashionable.
Aleksandr Demianchuk/TASS
One of the Europe’s largest mosques houses 7,000 people. It was built by architects N.V. Vasilyev and S.S. Krichinsky and the first service was held in 1913.
Aleksandr Demianchuk/TASS
The building was constructed in 1904 by architect Fyodor Lidval for his mother Ida. The house is decorated with a monogram of the letter “L” – the personal brand of the architect. On the face of the building one can see motives characteristic of Scandinavian architecture: wolves, hares, owls, lizards, toadstools and spiders.
Aleksandr Demianchuk/TASS
This mansion has a particular curiosity: in 1898 architect Ernest Franzevich Wirrich designed an elevator operating between the first and second floors.
Aleksandr Demianchuk/TASS
A few dozen metres farther along the avenue is the small Austrian square. The three building located on this square (No. 13, 16 and 20) were constructed by architect Wilhelm Schaub in 1902-1906. They were supposed carry the appearance of the North European Renaissance style. The intricate roof stereometry, steeples of houses 16 and 20 (constructed in 1906) outlined the principal architectural motives for Kamennoostrovsky prospekt.
The building of the Lyceum was moved from Tsarskoye Selo on the outskirts of St. Petersburg to a more central location in 1843. By that time the golden age of this educational institution were long gone. After 1917 the building’s purpose and owners changed several times. Currently it houses the College of Management and Economy “Aleksandrovsky Litsey”.
Aleksandr Demianchuk/TASS
The massive cluster of residential buildings which belonged of the First Russian Insurance Company (houses 24, 26, 28) takes up the whole block. The houses were constructed in 1913. The architects who designed them were three members of Benois family: Julius, Leon and Alexander. The main point of interest of this residential complex is the branched out system of communicating courtyards. You might want to go through the yards to the cour d'honneur at the Kronverkskaya ulitsa.
Aleksandr Demianchuk/TASS
The building was constructed in 1908-1910 as designed by the architect A.S. Ginger. The house was honoured by a diploma at the façade competition of 1912. The style of the building may be defined as eclectic neo-Baroque with arcade of columns and luxurious adornments.
Aleksandr Demianchuk/TASS
The alleyways of this street cross at unexpected angles, no symmetry or order – it is reminiscent of the Moscow Zamoskvorechye district.
× Petrograd Side
Open map