Caucasian cuisine restaurants

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This is a medium-sized inner city café, which serves mostly khinkali: traditional, with mutton or veal, boiled or fried. Its Caucasian culinary identity notwithstanding, Khinkalnaya upholds the European custom of serving breakfast in the morning: two kinds of eggs (Caucasus style or with pastrami), hot cereals and pancakes. There is outdoor seating on the porch out front.

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Reserve Russia 2018 LOC is not liable for any reservation services provided by third parties.

Saj of meat and vegetables, mutton, qutab, shashlyk, liver, and much more… Kavkazsky Dvorik (Caucasus Backyard) is a veritable showcase of Azerbaijani cuisine. But they don’t overlook the Georgian specialties no seaside restaurant can afford to ignore: khinkali and khachapuri. The alcohol menu is dominated by Azerbaijani wines, but wines from Armenia, Georgia and southern Russia are also listed.

Kavkazsky Dvorik serves breakfast from 10:00 in the morning till noon. The interior design is very modest, almost “like home”: some old photographs on the walls (views of the Caucasus Mountains, portraits of national epic heroes), some musical instruments hung around the fireplace, felt carpets on the floor, earthen pots, and a grapevine on the wall.

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Che? Kharcho! is a café launched by the Moscow restaurant group White Rabbit Family, whose restaurant White Rabbit is ranked 18 on The World’s 50 Best Restaurants 2016.

In two cafes Che? Kharcho! offers Black Sea food in the broadest possible sense, with an emphasis on grilled selections. Their concept of “Black Sea food” evidently includes everything we’ve been accustomed, since childhood, to eating when on seaside holiday in the South: khinkali, shish kebab, satsivi, chicken rissoles, kharcho, lulah kebab and local fish, both freshwater and saltwater. The owners of Che? Kharcho! claim and continually reiterate that all their food is prepared from local produce. The menu lists some complicated lemonades, berry drinks and compotes. The bar menu is not so diverse, but Georgian and Crimean wines are on.

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Reserve Russia 2018 LOC is not liable for any reservation services provided by third parties.

One of the most popular restaurants in Adler, La Luna is sited conveniently close to the beach. The menu is a mixed affair, but similarly to the majority of restaurants in Sochi, Caucasian specialties predominate. Those holiday-makers who have been tipped off come to La Luna and no other place for their khachapuri Imereti style, ajapsandali and shish kebab. Fish and seafood take up a large dedicated section on the menu. The wine list features an extensive selection of Georgian and Abkhazian wines. You can enjoy your wine on La Luna’s sprawling, nicely decorated porch.

La Luna is one of those places where it is appropriate to wear a suit and/or cocktail dress to dinner. The place is posh enough for that. Tourists appreciate a chance to wear something nice for their night out at La Luna, while executive travellers feel comfortable scheduling their business meetings here. There is live music in the evenings.

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On the outside, this is a regular diner surviving from the 1990s, but inside, Beliye Nochi is one of the top khinkali places in Sochi. People will travel from across the city to eat here, and bring families. Khinkali is the headliner here, available boiled or fried. Lulah kebab and shish kebab are also served (the most pricy shish kebab, with sturgeon, is 390 rubles per 100g). The desserts, particularly shortbread cupcakes and all kinds of jam, are delicious at Beliye Nochi.

The servings are very generous. It should be noted that this place only appears cheap because of its inexpensive and vastly popular khinkali (which is generally affordable everywhere) and its no-frills interior. But when you order char-broiled specialties, which are priced per 100 grams, the damage feels more like a mid-range restaurant, not a diner.

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Although this Georgian restaurant also has Italian specialties and things like borsch, Caesar salad and the Russian classic – Olivier salad on the menu, most patrons come to Khmeli & Suneli for its Georgian food. This restaurant is hard to miss. It’s right in the centre of Sochi, it has a large, comfortable porch, and the enticing smells of char-broiled meat emanating from it will guide you right to it. Their scrumptious veal shawarma is legendary. Very few restaurants get Tarkhun tarragon lemonade right, as in ‘not too sticky-sweet’. Khmeli & Suneli pulls it off: their Tarkhun has a fresh and subtle taste.

The restaurant runs a deli outlet: you can take your favourite food home with you. They serve breakfast in the morning, which is worth getting up early for. Make sure you order the Adzharian khachapuri scaled down to toy size for your child. After dinner, you can send your kid off to cooking master-class, which the restaurant offers on a regular basis.

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This unassuming Caucasian café specializes in khachapuri, offering several kinds of it. All khachapuri breads are huge and very good, but the Adzharian kind, with a generous helping of freshly made cheese, is the best-seller. There are a few salads on the menu, but they are more like sides for the baked masterpieces.

In terms of décor, this café is modest to say the least. Indeed, it is no place for a relaxed family dining experience or a long conversation. People come here to grab a quick yet delicious and affordable meal or to take khachapuri out. Khachapurnaya is rumoured to have the best khachapuri in town. They will deliver – very promptly! – to any part of Sochi with maximum freshness guaranteed.

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Claimed by locals to be one of the best Georgian restaurants in Sochi, Suluguni Bar feels like home: tables with tablecloths, matted light through a round lampshade, carpeted floors, the general atmosphere of simplicity, and a strictly Georgian menu: kharcho, pkhali, khinkali, khachapuri, ojakhuri, pelamushi and, last but not least – matsoni, which draws last night’s partiers with splitting headache like a magnet.

Suluguni is the place to be with your family on a weekend: the leisurely family dining experience is guaranteed. If you wish, you can play a game of backgammon after dinner. They welcome kids here. Even if the children don’t feel like drawing or playing, they will surely find something to amuse themselves with, like the hat with a bob that covers the teapot while the tea brews, or this dessert that looks like an overturned flowerpot. The prices are average.

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You take the cableway to Khmeli Ice Suneli. Inside, you find yourself in this austere ambience with a Georgian feel, Georgian food (reduced to minimalism, in a good way), and perfect service. You get this “lush life” vibe from the place, and you are apt to forget which country you’re in. The food tastes familiar - it’s southern Caucasus food alright. But somehow it tastes different when accompanied by this chilly decorum, the elegant European-class service and the sounds of foreign speech all around you. Khmeli Ice Suneli is highly regarded by foreign visitors from every part of the world.

Confidently order the familiar Georgian specialties: any of the numerous char-broiled offerings, khachapuri, eggplant rolls and home-baked bread. The menu does list some European and Russian selections, such as borsch and onion soup. There is a separate section for vegetarians. Leave some room for Khmeli Ice Suneli’s excellent jams, made from mandarins, feijoa and guilder rose – but not only. Half of the entrees are served in clay pots. The restaurant has a roomy porch. It’s nice to sit out there, sipping local wine and eyeing the other holiday-makers.

В ресторане работает огромная веранда, на которой приятно распивать местные вина и рассматривать отдыхающих. 

Reserve Russia 2018 LOC is not liable for any reservation services provided by third parties.

Amshensky Dvor serves Caucasian food, mostly Armenian with some infusions of Georgian, Greek and even Russian, amid fancy interiors evoking the harsh life of peasants in the mountains. The restaurant is part of a veritable outdoor museum of ethnography with carts, farming tools, earthenware and other historical household objects from the Caucasus. Some people visit the museum, but not the restaurant. Maybe they should think twice. The food is really good and the servings plentiful at Amshensky Dvor: their pork shish kebab is grilled to perfection, the lobio has the gentlest texture, the lavash bread is evanescently thin yet won’t break. A tip from the regulars: order one dish for two, this way you get to try more of the menu.